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Posts tagged: prison industrial complex

 


Symposium 2012


Overpoliced and Underprotected: Women, Race, and Criminalization

Recently, mass incarceration has been theorized as a system of racialized social control. This frame, however, often relies on long-standing gender reductionism that posits the primary subject of punishment and criminalization as male. At the same time, the unprecedented growth of female incarceration has spawned a host of gender-sensitive interventions, yet the discourses that are gender-sensitive often marginalize if not entirely erase the distinctive racial dimensions of the punitive turn in public policy. This Symposium will interrogate how criminalization is mediated through various intersections of race, gender and class and will shed light on the dimensions of racialized criminalization that are gendered differently.

Symposium 2012

Overpoliced and Underprotected: Women, Race, and Criminalization

Recently, mass incarceration has been theorized as a system of racialized social control. This frame, however, often relies on long-standing gender reductionism that posits the primary subject of punishment and criminalization as male. At the same time, the unprecedented growth of female incarceration has spawned a host of gender-sensitive interventions, yet the discourses that are gender-sensitive often marginalize if not entirely erase the distinctive racial dimensions of the punitive turn in public policy. This Symposium will interrogate how criminalization is mediated through various intersections of race, gender and class and will shed light on the dimensions of racialized criminalization that are gendered differently.

via @hermanaresist: Detailed call for submission for a “comp” zine or a collection of essays and articles by different editors and writers

Detailed call for submission for a “comp” zine or a collection of essays and articles by different editors and writers

  • Title of anthology: Dismantle: Preventing Metamorphosis

Here is a list of some the terms and ideas that are talked about in this post

topics as idea starters,
prison industrial complex or PIC,
institutional racism,
private prison systems,
criminal justice system,
prisoners and productionlinks in the prison system,
articles & data,
research,
patterns,
stories,
academic writing,
self-documentationsharing stories,
alternative media,
zines,
paradigm shift,
beautiful revolutionary acts,
society, community,
undocumented, immigrants,
“criminalizing” our youth,
“criminalizing” gender and sexualityschool mis/education,
arrests at school,
indirect schooling,
Raza-”The People,”
war & the police,
parenting, (m)othering,
chronically ill & disability,
what to submit,
how to submit,
“pitching” an idea,
other submission details,
helping in other ways
  • Brief summary of topics: Discussions on the lives of Latino/Chicano, Black & Indigenous brothers in the prison system, often referred to the “prison industrial complex” and also shortened to the abbreviation “PIC
  • Prison Industrial Complex is a phrase used by some to describe the idea behind prison expansion (bigger prisons for more prisoners and building more prisons), the idea that prisons solve issues in society such as preventing crimes, unemployment and drug addiction; the idea that prisons create more problems; the belief that the prison system has become an agency of racism and/or institutional racism; the belief that private prison systems use prisoners in terms of production (for example-manufacturing and processing that goes on inside prisons)
  • the prison industrial complex as a whole also takes into account the criminal justice system-which means the justice system and the prison system are linked and go hand in hand.
  • The prison industrial complex also involves government and state spending, budgeting and political influence to name a few overlapping “links.”

There are many articles and facts that give examples of how grave the situation is for young persons of color. If you would like me to email/send you the entire article, I can. If you would like to discuss and break down part of the article, once you’ve received it, I can also assist with that. The articles that I have come across are in English because that is the language I was going to write research in. I can assist in trying to find translations.

Articles and facts don’t tell complete stories, just show a pattern and are used by some to support their ideas and arguments. Many times no articles or studies exist-and haven’t been researched or written yet in subjects that you are likely to want to read up on. Plus, research like articles and studies don’t tell the complete story and can be difficult to get your hands on. For me, often times its difficult to comprehend the thick academic writing.

  •  
    • self-documentation is important, here’s why: Self-documentation, or in other words, writing your own stories and sharing with others or waiting to share until the right moment-comes under alot of different names, here we’re calling it “self documentation.” There are many ways to do this. My personal favorite is zine writing. This is not for everyone. Some write out their experiences in a story form or in poems. Others make videos and share them. Create art that tells a story or take photographs. Some might put their experiences into music and lyrics. Some “wear” their stories-like one inch buttons, patches, homemade screen printed t-shirts. Some are not ready to share their stories but help others get their stories across. I use the term “alternative media” to describe all those ways to tell your own story.

I have broken up the possible topics under broad “themes” for this zine. But they are only guidelines. The following are the topics with brief explanations. (Also, there is no clear line between topics, meaning, topics and ideas often blend. I do not mean to classify and categorize experiences and lives.)

  • on the streets/in the works: I used the term “paradigm shift” in my original call out. What I meant by this is a completely different way of thinking about prisons and our brothers in a radical and beautiful revolutionary way. Bringing in discussions from alot of different people that are affected by prisons, that work to change the system and who care about what is going on in the prison system. For example, in the original call out I stress how importance it is to have youth involved in this process, but there are many many levels inside and outside our society that need to be involved to change how and why the prison system is the way it is. So “on the streets/in the works” would be where you would write about what is going on in your town, what work you see happening in your community, ideas and opinions on things going on that you would like to share with others.
  • Sin Papeles : Spanish for “Without Papers.” This section would be essays and writings on undocumented and immigrant stories, articles and writings.
  • Schooling of our youth: This broad theme is for discussion on criminalizing black & brown youth in the US prison system. For example, black, latino & American Indian children are twice as likely to drop out of school. More students are being arrested at school. Questions to ask yourself are: why are brown and black kids being targeted? What is being taught in school, directly and indirectly? Is there something different that is going on in your community that you wouuld like to share?
  • Dismantle: Queer, bi/gay & lesbian & trans Latin@s/Chican@s of color. When gender and sexuality is criminalized (criminalized, briefly is when behaviors and people are automatically targeted as criminals, their being as crimes.
  • Raza & Guerra/ Police State: This is Spanish for The People and War. Broad themes that discuss culture, war and/or the police.
  • Parenting/(m)othering: Parenting and (m)othering that places all the above, and more!, into perspective.
  • Chronically Ill/Disability: In 2003, there were three times as many men and women with mental illness in prisons than in mental health hospitals. This is just once piece of “data” that is used to show how unequal and unfair the system is to persons with disabilities. Sometimes persons become chronically ill while in prison.

What can you submit?

Here is a brief list on what you can submit to use as a spring board for ideas.

  • Artwork (remember that the zine will probably be black and white).
  • Photographs
  • Interviews
  • Diary/Journal entries
  • Stories
  • essays and articles
  • reports

How to submit?

You can send a submission two ways.

  1. First, you can send something that is already finished and ask for it to be included.
  2. Or, you can send an email and say you want to write something for this zine and tell briefly what you want to write on. For example, if you want to write about an adult education class in your community, you would say in your email how that would fit into the overall theme of this zine. Think of it like this: In a few sentences connect your idea with the theme of the zine, this can be the juice of your story.

Sending in your ideas first is a good starter on a larger piece, say you want to send in an interview, but are not sure if it would go or you think it would not be interesting. Sending a few sentences or paragraphs would give the editor a better understanding of where you are coming from and a general direction of where you are going. This is sometimes called “pitching” your idea.

You would send your ideas or submissions to the email address: noemi.mtz (at) gmaildotcom. You would attach any art, photos, or  piece you have already written as an attachment with a brief description.

Other details about submitting:  Sometimes these things come up when submitting to zines.

  • word count? Anything 2,000 words or less should be good.
  • Number of art/photos to send? 5-7 should be fine.
  • More than 1 submission? Lets limit it to two submissions.
  • What format? Doc or docx (Thats a Word document) or a txt (text file).

I want to help in another way, what can I do? There’s alot of ways to help with this project, probably even ways that I haven’t thought of. Here are a few that I can come up with:

  • Edit a section. You would receive the submissions, interact with the writers, send/answer feedback and emails. Would involve reading the submissions and seeking submissions.
  • Online presence: If you are good with tumblr, facebook, twitter and other forms of online social media you can help out.
  • Fundraising: If you’d like to fundraise in your area for this project to go to print. You would organize the fundraiser and seek out volunteers in your area. This is a great way to start discussions on the prison system in your community.
  • Printing: If you have access to low cost printing.
  • Media: If you would like to be the person who talks to media, are passionate about this work-this is your calling!
  • Have a discussion in your community about the prison system and how it affects each other. As parents, children, students, friends, lovers.
  • Teachers and professors: encourage your students to think about the complexities of the prison system and discussions that frame the prison system not as the answer but as a mechanism of inequality *Please let me know if you’re going to use this document in a class as I’d like to document it myself :) .

This case has attracted worldwide attention, but it is, in essence, no different from other capital cases. Across the country, the legal process for the death penalty has shown itself to be discriminatory, unjust and incapable of being fixed. Just last week, the Supreme Court granted a stay of execution for Duane Buck, an African-American, hours before he was to die in Texas because a psychologist testified during his sentencing that Mr. Buck’s race increased the chances of future dangerousness. Case after case adds to the many reasons why the death penalty must be abolished.